Tag Archives: sichuan

Sounds of China

Listen to the two latest Soundscapes of life in China.

 

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New Podcast Series: Sounds Of China.

We have a new podcast series Sounds Of China. SOC is a soundscape of Chinese life.

Each soundscape will be 5-6 minutes long. The first soundscape was recorded on the Chengdu Metro line 2.

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Looking for podcasters in China

We are changing TIC China to a podcast network. The new name is TIC China Network.

Basically we are looking for people who want to record a podcast about their lives in China.

The podcast could be an interview, poem, song etc but it must relate to living in China.

We will host the podcast on our network for free. Please note this is not for profit we don’t have any sponsorship or adverts.

You can record a podcast with your smartphone. For example some of our podcasts have been recorded on iPhones and Samsungs using the supplied headsets. Just don’t do it in a noisy area.

MP3 or Wav format is preferred.

So if your interested in joining the network. All you have to do is email your podcast to Ian at the following 1061784369@qq.com

Links to podcast

itunes               https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/tic-china/id1048429938

Acast                https://www.acast.com/ticchina

Soundcloud    https://soundcloud.com/a-b-in-china

StitcherRadio http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/tic-china?refid=stpr

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TIC China Podcast: A-Z series Racism and Xenophobia in China.

In our latest episode we get into a deep discussion about racism and xenophobia in China. We talk about peoples attitude to other races and the big brother attitude of Han Chinese towards the other 55 minorities. We also talk about the rise in nationalism in China at certain times of year.

 

Please don’t forget you can follow the podcast on the following

Acast

iTunes Please subscribe to our iTunes

Stitcher Radio

Soundcloud

Follow us on Twitter Facebook

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TIC China Podcast: A-Z series Law, Money and New Money in China.

We have two great episodes this week.

Law: We talk about what the police actually do in China. The cult of community policing and contract laws and a lot more.

Money & New Money: We talk about money, the growth in app payments like Alipay and China’s Nouveau riche.

 

Please don’t forget you can follow the podcast on the following

Acast

iTunes Please subscribe to our iTunes

Stitcher Radio

Soundcloud

Follow us on Twitter Facebook

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Becoming a dad in China Part six Podcast

Part six of Becoming a Dad In China. Ian talks about birth certificates and the recent vaccine scandal in China.

Please don’t forget you can follow the podcast on the following

Acast

iTunes Please subscribe to our iTunes

Stitcher Radio

Soundcloud

Follow us on Twitter Facebook

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TIC China Podcast Mini Series Three Short Episodes this week.

All we have three great episodes this week part of our mini series.

Austin meets some ladies of the night.
Ian and his son discuss this weeks release of Star Wars The Force Awakens in China.
Ian also talks about private birth hospitals in China part of the becoming a dad series.

Check out links below

iTunes Please subscribe to our iTunes

Stitcher Radio

Soundcloud

Follow us on Twitter Facebook

 

 

 

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TIC China Podcast Episode H of the A-Z Series

In this latest episode Ian & Austin talk about H for Holidays.  Recorded live in The Bookworm Chengdu.

Check out links below

iTunes Please subscribe to our iTunes

Stitcher Radio

Soundcloud

Follow us on Twitter Facebook

 

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The Chinese Pollution Revolution 2016?

No you can’t fool the children of pollution.

Over the last few days Chengdu’s pollution levels have been extreme no difference really from the last 5 years just the same as usual. In the last couple of years I have started to wear a pollution mask on these danger days. So yesterday (NYE) I popped on my mask and headed off to the metro station on the way I walked past a young father and his very young son as soon as the father saw me he started to laugh. I was so angry I just muttered through my mask “wanker”.  I was thinking how dare you laugh at me you’re the one bringing your child out into this shit. I must note the local government sends out messages that children should not go outside.  I usually feel a bit weird in Chengdu as you usually don’t see many people wearing masks and being a Lowai (foreigner) makes me extra pointing fodder. “Oh look at the Lowai with the pollution mask” laugh, laugh, chuckle, snort and cough.

Finally I arrived at my metro station downtown as soon as I stepped out of the station I was overwhelmed. The amount of young Chengdu locals with pollution masks was astonishing. As I walked down the street to work I was getting nods of recognition from other mask wearers this had never happened before usually when another mask wearers saw each other they would just hang their head in shame, but not today folks! What’s changed? Maybe it was the documentary earlier in the year called Under The Dome, which is now banned in China. Maybe it’s because young people in China have finally had enough of being bombarded with commercialism and has come to the realisation that some things in life are more important.

Is this a pollution revolution?

Happy New Year

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TIC China Podcast Episode G of the A-Z Series

In this latest episode Ian & Austin talk about G for Ganbei.  Recorded live in The Bookworm Chengdu.

Check out links below

iTunes Please subscribe to our iTunes

Stitcher Radio

Soundcloud

Follow us on Twitter Facebook

 

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TIC China Podcast Episode 6

In this latest episode Ian & Austin talk about F for Food.  Recorded live in a secret location in Chengdu.

Check out links below

iTunes Please subscribe to our iTunes

Stitcher Radio

Soundcloud

Follow us on Twitter Facebook

 

 

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TIC China Episode 2 A&B

This is our first full length podcast which is now available on iTunes, Stitcher and Soundcloud.
Recorded live on the patio at The Bookworm Chengdu Ian & Austin discuss the first two letters on their A-Z guide for living in China.

Check out links below

iTunes Please subscribe to our iTunes

Stitcher Radio

Soundcloud

Follow us on Twitter Facebook

Bookworm Chengdu

Listen to Stitcher

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TIC CHINA PODCAST IS HERE

Yes folks the new TIC China podcast has finally arrived.  Episode 1 is just an introduction.

Please join our Facebook Group

Also click below to listen to our first podcast.

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Beautiful Time Lapse Video Of Chengdu.

I found this amazing time lapse video on Youtube by Xilin Wang

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Cycling in Chengdu. Natooke.

I have been cycling in Chengdu for the last couple of years, but my rate of cycling has increased since November 2014.  I have one bicycle I use just for the city and I have another bike for cycling in the countryside.

Take a listen to a podcast interviewing my favourite bicycle shop in Chengdu Natooke.

Natooke Podcast

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The Curious Orange.  Frame is a Chinese brand Forever, but most of the components are from Natooke.

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Jacob (Natooke) fixing The Curious Orange.

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The Trooper for countryside rides.

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Snow Mountain Surprise

Yesterday morning I woke around 6am in our Chengdu apartment opened the windows and saw something I have never seen before in Chengdu.  I could actually see Xi Ling Snow Mountain looking towards the North West from near Wanda plaza on the 2nd ring road.  You could actually see the snow on top of the mountains with your naked eye.  My father in law told me that when he was younger you could see it everyday, but with the rise in pollution over the last twenty years it maybe happens only a couple of times a year if your lucky.

The picture quality is not so good as I was using my phone.  The other pic was from a Chengdu website.

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Two White Chicks In China Podcast

A big thanks to Hollie & Nora for mentioning my blog in this weeks podcast.

Two White Chicks In China

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The old ways are not always the best, but some are.

“Lets get some rabbit tonight?” I asked my wife.  “If I eat rabbit our baby will have a hair lip”

Every week I hear something which I feel is bizarre about child birth in China.4351006

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Two White Chicks In China Podcast

Great podcast this week from TWCC.  Click on pic below for link.

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Baby License!

In China the land of the free and home of the brave.  Sorry made a typo or was it a Freudian slip.

Getting any kind of official paperwork done in China is always a nightmare.   You are past from pillar to post and try getting anything done between 11am – 2pm no chance.

I was actually dreading to amount of BS we would have to go through regarding the baby License.

You must get a License 准生证  to have a baby in China.

Miracles do happen

This by far has been the easiest document I have ever got in China and I only had to sign 2 pieces of paper and go to 2 different offices.  Compared to everything else this was a breeze.

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Going Private

After visiting the public hospital a couple of times we decided to check out the cost for private care in Chengdu.  Basically we had two options Angel Hospital and Natural New Born.  Angel was too expensive and I have some friends who had their babies at Angel and they informed that they always have hidden costs.  Also the natural birth rate at Angel is a lower than NNB.  We chose NNB because a lot more of our friends have had their babies here.  Also everybody had nothing but good words to say about NNB.

 

The benefits of going to a private hospital become apparent as soon as you walk through the door.

  • No waiting times which is a blessing as I don’t really want my wife waiting around for three hours just to get an appointment.
  • The husband can be present at every appointment.   In the public hospital the husband is not even allowed to be present at any of the scans or appointments.
  • The husband can watch the birth and cut the cord.  This is not allowed in the public hospital.
  • You have the same doctor through the whole of your pregnancy and birth.
  • You will not be coerced into have a c-section.
  • You get your own private room.
  • Clean (They have soap in the bathrooms)
  • Your doctor is available 24/7 via telephone or wechat in case you have any concerns during your pregnancy.
  • My wife has access to classes and a mother support group.

The list goes on.

Check out Sascha blog about his experience in the public hospital.

 

No Queue

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The Public Hospital

At first we wanted to use a public hospital like 99% of locals do.  After my wife found out she was pregnant the next step was to get down the hospital and do some basic blood tests.  Also every Chinese woman has to start a file called a 档案 (dang’an).  It’s basically a record of all your appointments and doctors notes.

This first visit was done in late February.

Step one: Try to get an appointment at The West China Hospital (Huaxi).

Before you get an appointment you have to obtain a Hospital card with your Chinese ID.  Very simple and quick put your details into a interactive card machine and good to go

My wife called the appointment hotline, either that or queue at 4am to get a ticket.  They informed her she could not get an appointment until 2 weeks later.

Solution: Outside the hospital you can get what is called a yellow cow ticket.  Basically you pay somebody to queue outside with your Huaxi hospital card.  They have some connection with the people selling appointment tickets.  We payed around 200rmb to just get the appointment ticket for the next day.  This does not include the price of the doctor which is another kettle of fish.

Step two: Go to appointment.

You choose your doctor when making the appointment.  A low level doctor (junior) will cost a lot less, but they have more appointment times than the high level doctor.  So we opted for a mid level doctor around 60rmb.  When you arrive at the hospital its similar to the end of a football match when everybody is trying to get out of the ground.  First step pay for the appointment.  Find the cashier desk which is next to the ten ATM machines, pay cash get receipt.  Next step find your doctor.

Enter the maze and crowds of confused mum’s to be.

After 20 minutes we found our doctor.  When your appointment number is called you will enter the doctors room. (women only).  Now from my experience in the UK this is usually a one on one experience, but not in China it’s more like a one on twenty experience.  The room is full of expecting mums and people just randomly walk into the room by mistake or try to blag their late appointment with the doctor.  No respect is shown to either patient or doctor.

Step three: Blood test

After trying to find the blood test area which is actually similar to a garage forecourt.  You queue up with the other 10 thousand patients and wait for one of the magic doors to open.  After your blood test is complete you have to go back to the doctor.  Only to be informed that your test results will be ready tomorrow.

This took around a total of three hours.  I just felt like the women were herded around like cattle.

Step four: Test results

Come back next day.  The helpful doctor will inform you that everything is OK, go home and rest until your first scan.

At not one point was this experience a good one.  There was no care in the so called caring system.

After speaking to lots of friends and family we decided to go private.  One of my friends had her baby in this hospital and had to sleep in the hallway for two nights.  No thanks.

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Becoming a dad in China.

At the beginning of March we found out that we will have a baby this year.  We are currently at 17 weeks and 4days.  I will be writing this blog regarding the ups and downs of becoming a Lowai (foreigner) dad in China.

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Pollution In Chengdu

First photo taken 26th June 2014 second photo taken 28th June 2014

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